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    Teacher's Remembrance Artwork at Westminster

    An emotive First World War memorial painting by Kimbolton School art teacher Mr Richard Walker has gone on display at the Houses of Parliament.

    Kimbolton School Art Teacher Richard Walker with his First World War Memorial Painting on Display at the Houses of ParliamentAn emotive First World War memorial painting by Kimbolton School art teacher Mr Richard Walker has gone on display at the Houses of Parliament. Over 25 people attended a private view of the piece last night, including Headmaster Mr Jonathan Belbin, Huntingdon MP Mr Jonathan Djanogly and several Old Kimboltonians.

    The work, which has five panels, stands more than three metres tall and is composed of 35 separate canvases featuring a variety of military objects. It is based on the composition of late Byzantine paintings of the Last Judgement.

    Mr Walker created the piece to mark the lives of relatives who died in the Great War – and it includes personal family items such as medals, and hat badges from the Huntingdonshire Cyclist Battalion, The Bedfordshire Regiment and The City of London Rifles.

    Mr Walker said: “I focused on my great uncle Fredrick Stanley Colbert and his brother and cousins, who were from Offord, and Ernest Walker from Kempston, who died just five days from the end of war.”

    Huntingdon MP Mr Jonathan Djanogly is sponsoring the piece after Mr Walker sent him images of his work; the exhibition is also financially supported by the Rotary Club of St Neots. Since the exhibit was put on display last week, it has become a real talking point in Westminster.

    Mr Chris Bates, Deputy Head (Academic), added: “It was a memorable evening which marked the increasing recognition of Richard’s work and talent. He combines creating thought-provoking works like these with teaching our pupils - who clearly benefit from having such an inspirational teacher.”

    The memorial painting has previously been shown at the Imperial War Museum Duxford, Ely Cathedral and St Neots Museum. It will remain on display in London until Friday 6 February.